src="http://www.mirrorlessons.com/wp-content/themes/mirrorlessons The OM-D Successor 2013? What we'd like to see... - MirrorLessons - The Best Mirrorless Camera Reviews
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Date: 10/03/2013 | By: Heather

The OM-D Successor 2013? What we’d like to see…

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The OM-D Successor 2013? What we’d like to see…

There is no doubt that Olympus has struck gold with the creation of the OM-D E-M5, a mirrorless camera with a compact body and a level of image quality that would rival even the newest low-to-mid end DSLRs from Nikon and Canon. This incredible image quality remains intact even at high ISO levels and slow shutter speeds thanks to its internal image stabilisation. (Read our full review to find out more.) If that weren’t enough, this camera is also a looker, with its attractive retro-styling. In short, the OM-D E-M5 is pure perfection, and even comes at a reasonable price for the amount you receive in such a small package.

So, on a camera as perfect as the OM-D E-M5, where could Olympus possible make improvements? Having owned the camera for over a month now, here are a few suggestions we’d like to put forward to Olympus, if they’ll lend us an ear!



  • While compact bodies make for easy portability, we found that the OM-D E-M5 wasn’t the most comfortable to hold, especially for Mat who has large hands. (In contrast, the GH3, which is a shade smaller than an entry-level DSLR, feels great in your hand thanks to its substantial grip.) When the OM-D successor comes out, we’d like to see an ever-so-slightly larger, more ergonomic grip.
  • Certain buttons, such as the playback button and the arrow pad, feel fragile and aren’t very easy to press. When the new E-M5 comes out, it would be great to see sturdier and larger buttons. Of course, bigger buttons warrant a slightly bigger body, which makes our first point all the more valid.
  • We’d love to see some more Function buttons and a dedicated ISO button somewhere on the camera.
  • For those who love taking videos, a better video codec would be an advantage since the sensor of the E-M5 is already so advanced. We’re thinking AVCHD with a bit rate of 40 or 50 MB per second. A microphone input and a headphone jack would also two welcome additions.
  • An orientable LCD screen such as the one on the GH3 would more useful that the current LCD screen, despite the fact that it does rotate upwards and downwards.
  • Finally, we would like to see a built-in flash. Even though we usually work with natural light, a built-in flash could be useful in situations where natural light simply isn’t available. Let’s face it – nobody wants to waste time attaching an external flash to a hotshoe.

Of course, we’re just nitpicking here, and we’d quite happily stick with the EM-5 if Olympus had no intention to expand on the line. (Rumors, however, suggest otherwise. According to 4/3 Rumors,”something big” is on the way in April. An OM-D E-M6 perhaps? Only time will tell…)

How about you? What would you change about the OM-D E-M5?


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About the author: Heather Broster

Heather Broster was born in Canada, has lived in Japan and Italy but currently calls Wales home. She is a full-time gear tester at MirrorLessons. You can follow her on Google+, Twitter or Facebook!

  • Ed

    Late reply on this topic but I’d like to see a very SIMPLE way of engaging/disengaging bracketing. Hint…look at the ancient Lumix G1.

  • Heather

    Hi Cem,

    We aren’t looking for a small DSLR. All we’d like to see is a *slightly* bigger body with the same design as the original E-M5, not a replica of the GH3. We simply referred to the GH3 as a good example of an ergonomically friendly body, not how we want to see the E-M5 in the future. As for the built-in flash, it can be useful on informal occasions if you don’t have an external flash on hand. Of course, if you’re shooting professionally, it is a different story.

    Cheers,
    Mat & Heather

  • http://www.cempayzin.com Cem

    Hi,

    I am not sure if I understand what you really want. OM-D E-M5 is a different camera. It is not design to be a small DSLR. If you want something like that you have the option to get GH3. I agree on having a better codec on video and may be a mic jack but i totaly disagree on having same shape like GH3 (or SMALLER DSLR). I am totally for having no flash on the camera. I think very few people knows how to use flash and I don;t think build in flash helps since it is not power enough for daylight for fills.

    I think some camera users like DSLRs so much and I understand that. I think you and many other is probably looking for a camera sized like GH3 with OM-D E-M5 sensor and IBIS with JPEG engine. I think you should may be write an article about GH3 and name it what Panasonic needs to do on next GH3…

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