src="http://www.mirrorlessons.com/wp-content/themes/mirrorlessons Fuji X Day with the Riflessi Camera Store: Hands-on with the Fuji X-E2 - MirrorLessons - The Best Mirrorless Camera Reviews
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Date: 05/12/2013 | By: Heather

Fuji X Day with the Riflessi Camera Store: Hands-on with the Fuji X-E2

X100S, 1/50, f/ 4/1, ISO 1600

Fuji X Day with the Riflessi Camera Store: Hands-on with the Fuji X-E2

If there is one thing Fujifilm Italia is good at, it is holding Fuji X Days where people can come and try the full range of Fuji X Series products, from professional cameras like the X-Pro1 to high-end point-and-shoots like the XQ1, and a whole array of quality lenses in between.

This week, our friends at the Riflessi Camera Store were the hosts of a two-part Fuji X Day, consisting of a try-out session at their store and a professional shoot with models later on in the evening. Since Mat was away in London on a job and I had to work late, I only made it to the second half of the day. My aim? To get my hands on the Fuji X-E2, even if just for twenty minutes!



Note: All images used in this article are OOC JPGs taken with the Vivid film simulation mode and 1+ sharpness.

The new Fuji X-E2
The new Fuji X-E2

The X-E2 is the successor to the X-E1, which was released back in late 2012. So many improvements have been made on this new model that some photographers are even trading in their X-Pro1 for it, or relegating the X-Pro1 to a second body. The most significant include a much improved autofocus, better handling, the inclusion of WiFi, the X-Trans II CMOS sensor found in the X100s, a high resolution LCD and EVF, and 7fps continuous shooting for up to 28 frames. In total, Fuji claims that around 60 improvements have been made over the original X-E1, though some are more subtle than others.

Since I only had twenty minutes before I had to hand the X-E2 over to another enthusiastic photographer, I wasn’t able to come to any profound conclusions about the new camera but I can confirm that it handles very well. Ergonomically speaking, it is close to perfection. Every button and dial was in reach of my fingers. The Q button we all know and love, for instance, has been repositioned to the upper middle of the camera’s rear for improved access.

X-E2, 1/100, f/ 4, ISO 4000
X-E2, 1/100, f/ 4, ISO 4000

A professional model was present at the event so I decided to use the Fujinon 60mm f/2.4 macro for most of my shooting. I had tried this versatile lens back at the Fuji event in Cossato, and found it apt not only for macro but for portraiture as well.

X-E2, 1/100, f/ 2.4, ISO 1600
X-E2, 1/100, f/ 2.4, ISO 1600

Regarding image quality, there isn’t much to say that hasn’t already been said about the X100s, which has the same sensor as the X-E2: the performance is excellent even in low-light situations at high ISO levels. With the camera set to any one of the beautiful Film Simulation Modes, I would have no issues using the JPGs straight out of the camera as the rendering is very pleasant.

X-E2, 1/100, f/ 2.4, ISO 2000
X-E2, 1/100, f/ 2.4, ISO 2000

As for the autofocus, I did notice a substantial improvement over previous models. I tested the camera by rapidly focusing on different objects in the room and 95% of the time, the AF locked on right away. We’re not talking Olympus OM-D fast, of course, but I would now say that the AF is up to standard. I shall be very curious to see how well it tackles continuous shooting and tracking when we receive the camera for two weeks of testing.

X-E2, 1/100, f/ 4, ISO 4000
X-E2, 1/100, f/ 4, ISO 4000

I was also very impressed with the resolution and refresh rate of the EVF. Having never tried the X-E1, I cannot draw a comparison, but from what I’ve read we’re talking about a refresh rate improvement of 20 fps to 50/60 fps in low light.

Photographers trying out the vast range of Fuji products
Photographers trying out the vast range of Fuji products

The X-E2 is just the first of many exciting products we’ll be seeing from Fujifilm in the coming months. We have the weatherproof high-end model coming in early 2014 to look forward to, the X-Pro1s, and most likely a full-frame version of the X100s. Down the road, we may even see a full-frame interchangeable lens camera with an organic sensor, but that’s a subject for another year and another post! :-)

Below you can look through the rest of the photos I took at the event with the Fuji X-E2. Never have willing models been so plentiful!

Many thanks to Riflessi Camera Store and Fujifilm Italia for holding this event!

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About the author: Heather Broster

Heather Broster was born in Canada, has lived in Japan and Italy but currently calls Wales home. She is a full-time gear tester at MirrorLessons. You can follow her on Google+, Twitter or Facebook!

  • Mikey

    The 6400 skin smoothing makes these photos look awful! Fuji why!!!

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